What are the symptoms? 

Myelofibrosis causes scar tissue and fibrous tissue to build up inside the bone marrow, so that the marrow can’t produce blood cells effectively. This inability to produce blood cells effectively can cause a reduction in red blood cells (anaemia) which may lead to fatigue. The body then may compensate by producing blood cells in other organs, resulting in the enlargement of the spleen or liver. Changes in the production of certain body chemicals (inflammatory cytokines) may also cause what are known as constitutional symptoms, such as fatigue and sweating.

  

 

Want to know more about how your symptoms are affecting you? Use the MPN10 tool to help you assess your symptoms and explain to your doctor how you are feeling. View MPN10 »

 

The list of MF symptoms below doesn’t cover every possible symptom, but should give you a feel for the more common or characteristic ones. Work through this list and consider what symptoms relate to you. Remember, you may not be experiencing any symptoms at this point, especially if you have been recently diagnosed, as around 20% of patients who are diagnosed have no symptoms.

 
    • Symptoms of anaemia (low red blood count)
      • -Fatigue and weakness
      • -Inactivity (associated with fatigue)
 
    • Symptoms associated with an enlarged spleen (splenomegaly):
      • -Abdominal pain and discomfort, on the left side below the ribs
      • -Early satiety (feeling of fullness)
      • -Weight loss (associated with loss of appetite)
 
  • Other symptoms:
    • -pain and discomfort in the abdomen or stomach
    • -Skin itchiness (also called pruritus)
    • -Concentration problems
    • -Excessive sweating, especially at night
    • -Fever
    • -Bone pain
 

See the treatment options for MF

 

The blood factory, the bone marrow, is scarred and that’s why you’re not getting the blood you need, and other organs in your body try to compensate, like the spleen, and that’s why it is getting big, because it cannot compensate that well

- Dr Haifa Kathrin Al-Ali, Oncology Haematologist, University Clinic of Leipzig